Biking Without Pedals: Memories of John and ALS

A man sitting on the beach with a large, black and brown dog.
(CBC, Facebook)

It’s ironic to consider that I work for the provincial government—an organization well known for its love of acronyms—and yet the one acronym that impacted my life the most was one that I was uninformed of: ALS.

When I started working for the government, my co-worker, John, was working with me. When he spoke, it was very slow with a low, almost monotone sound. My first impression was that he must have had a stroke at some point, which can affect one’s speech patterns. It turns out it was a different beast altogether: ALS. Continue reading “Biking Without Pedals: Memories of John and ALS”

Post-Traumatic Sheikh Disorder | Part 2: Healing and Understanding

Teddy bear with a patch

Healing

As I mentioned in Part One, I turned to the internet for my answers. In my search for understanding, I came across a major problem: I didn’t know when to stop.  I hopped from website to website, following the breadcrumbs of the search results. I would think I had it beat, when suddenly I would read someone’s opinion on it, and the whole loop would start again.

I had opportunities to find closure on it. I was invited to a mosque where the imam and a sheikh were discussing the issue with a group of Muslim converts.

But I declined, partly because I felt I had reached my own conclusions, but mostly because I was afraid. As time progressed, I became frustrated with myself, that I wasn’t able to just shut the issue away and move on with my life.

Continue reading “Post-Traumatic Sheikh Disorder | Part 2: Healing and Understanding”

Memories in the Walls

There is an innate connected between our memories and the places we make them in. If we think hard enough we can all remember what it was like to walk through the halls of our school, or sit in the living room of a house we once lived in, or the building where we had our first job. And more importantly, you’ll not only remember, but feel something about these places. These buildings are more than just boxes and shelters, plaster and drywall. These walls are the places where we form our memories and our experiences and, ultimately, ourselves. Continue reading “Memories in the Walls”

Reflections on Burnout

Burned out match

Sometimes I envy slackers. They have a pretty good idea how to keep things chill, and not stress out too much. They don’t worry too much about what work needs to be done, only what’s going on right now.

Then on the other side of the spectrum, you have people who try and fill every waking minute with work, with business, with getting stuff done. Sounds productive? Well, it is until you crash.

And that’s what happened to me. Multiple times. So here’s what I’ve learned about it:

  Continue reading “Reflections on Burnout”